Category Archives: General

Everglades Airpark

The Everglades Airpark lies in the middle of the 10,000 Islands Region. It’s easy to
see from the air where this region got its name from. This unique landscape made up of thousands of small islands stretches over a distance of 25 nm – starting with Marco Island to several miles south of Everglades City. If you’re lucky enough to fly over this labyrinth at sunset, you will be treated to a light show, the likes of which you will never have seen before.

Everglades Airpark

With a runway length of just 2400 ft, Everglades Airpark has one of the shortest runways in Florida. Even if most European pilots are used to such short runway lengths, it’s better to err on the side of caution because its proximity to the sea and a group of trees to the west can cause windy surprises. Once on the ground, this airfield will seem like the last outpost of civilization, which is rather unusual for Florida. There are no traffic lights or taxis. Golf courses or shopping malls? That’s a negative! Instead, you can experience nature at its purest with all kinds of outdoor recreational activities. The FBO has brochures and fliers from most of the local tour companies and tourist attractions.
I recommend picking a place first, because this then determines whether you will turn right or left at the end of the road leading out of the airport. Some airboat operators and restaurants also provide a shuttle service, which can be a good option depending on your sense of adventure, especially during the hotter time of year. Turning left takes you into town, turning right takes you to the Everglades National Park, to Glades Haven Marina and to the Oyster House. It’s about a 10-minute walk to get there.

Everglades

Boat tours start from the Everglades National Park and take about 1.5 to almost 2 hours. The Ten Thousand Islands Tour starts at about 9:30 a.m. and runs hourly until about 5:00 p.m. The Mangrove Wilderness Tour starts from 9:00 a.m. and runs about every other hour until 3:30 p.m. (9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 1:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m., 3:30 p.m.). Ranging in price from $30 to $40, these tours are not exactly cheap, but they
are definitely a genuine experience.

If you’d prefer exploring the region on your own, you can rent kayaks or motor boats at the Glades Haven Marina. However, the motor boats are rented out only on a day basis, not per hour. If you want a snack before heading out on a tour, the place to go is the Oyster House which serves all kinds of seafood as well as steaks. I highly recommend trying the stone crab, which is found mainly in the Gulf of Mexico, or alligator. Located right next to the restaurant is a wooden observation tower where you get a great view of the Mangrove landscape.

If you walk out of the airport and take a left, you’ll reach a main traffic inter-section after about 15-20 minutes where you’ll see the Everglades City town hall at the north end of town. Take a right at the intersection and after a few minutes, you’ll see the Raw Bar restaurant, a rustic structure built on stilts where you can enjoy refreshments right on the water. Boats belonging to several airboat tour operators are also moored here. Right next door is the Seafood Depot.

Everglades Airboat Pier

Back at the main intersection, if you turn left and then take an immediate right onto N Storter Ave, you’ll come to the Triad Seafood Café after about 10 mi-
nutes. This restaurant also has a patio right on the water. Some guests arrive here by boat or seaplane. The Triad is very popular and well-known beyond Everglades City. It’s best to call in advance to check opening times and to reserve a table. (+1 239 695 0722). You can also request pick-up at the airport. It is always worth asking!

Held each year at the beginning of February is the Everglades Seafood Festival, an event that’s not to be missed.

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Airspace around Los Angeles

Airspace around Los Angeles

The airspace around Los Angeles area is one of busiest in the world. In 2012, Los Angeles International (LAX) alone recorded almost 700,000 aircraft movements, which makes it the world’s third busiest airport behind Atlanta and Chicago O’Hare. Within a radius of approx. 30 nm, there are three Class C airports (Burbank, Santa Ana and Ontario) as well as several other airports, which include Van Nuys, Santa Monica and Northrop Hawthorne, to name just a few. They all attract a lot of jet traffic. Van Nuys, for example, recorded an average of almost 1400 aircraft movements per day. (Source: Airnav.com)

One might assume that general aviation traffic is not welcome in such busy airspace. This couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, air traffic controllers treat general aviation just as professionally as major airline traffic. Though they naturally have their hands full, they do their best to respond to all VFR flight following requests. Aviators and air traffic controllers alike have found that this increases everyone’s safety and is in no way disruptive to regular airline traffic. Also, there are no less than five VFR routes through the LAX Class B airspace. Of them, the Mini Route is probably the most spectacular because at 2500 ft it goes directly above the numbers of both LAX runways. Each of these routes requires strict compliance with all stated airspace regulations. That’s why, prior to flying in this airspace, it is a good idea to find out who you have to talk to and when in order to fly safely through this sector of airspace. As long as you comply with the rules and regulations that are described in the Los Angeles Terminal Approach Chart, you are in no way the exception to flying these routes, rather the rule and it becomes a true pleasure using the airspace around Los Angeles.

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Fantasy of Flight closing its doors

Kermit WeeksOn March 4, 2014, Kermit Weeks, owner of the world’s largest private collection of vintage aircraft, announced that his Fantasy of Flight attraction in central Florida will be closing its doors to the public on April 4, 2014. In his video message he explained that his business model was no longer economically viable in its present form and his operations were in urgent need of restructuring. Although we regret the fact that this outstanding collection will no longer be open to the public, we wish Kermit Weeks all the best in finding a new way to display his airworthy museum pieces to a wider audience. He has yet to reveal the plans he has in this direction, but we are hoping for a further announcement soon.

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Shell has developed unleaded 100-octane fuel to replace 100LL

Shell has developed unleaded 100-octane fuel to replace 100LL

Shell Oil announced that is has developed an unleaded 100-octane piston engine fuel to replace 100LL.  Presumably, the fuel will enter the FAA’s recently established fuel testing and certification process. Shell said the fuel is a culmination of 10 years in R&D and initial testing has been done with two OEMs, Lycoming and Piper. None of the companies offered any information on what the new fuel might cost.

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First preview available

While the German language version is already on the market, we are still working on the English version at full speed. Some parts of the translation are already done, so we have provided a preview on Createspace (Amazon). We hope that you like it.

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Aviator's Guide to be introduced at Tannkosh

After months of hard work, the Aviator’s Guide to Florida is now finally complete and ready to be presented. And this August there’s surely no better setting for its introduction than Tannkosh. Anyone who wants to take a look at the Aviator’s Guide will find it directly on the stand belonging to the fliegermagazin, which is supporting the guide. We look forward to seeing you there and to finally being able to present the Aviator’s Guide to Florida to the public. See you soon in Tannheim!

fliegermagazin

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